Margaret McMullan – Every Father’s Daughter

 Today, MBB welcomes author Margaret McMullan, who has put together a wonderful book in which twenty four women writers share their very special memories of the father /daughter relationship

EVERY FATHER’S DAUGHTER really is a book to treasure – and it seems to be released to coincide with Father’s Day.






How did you decide which authors to reach out to for this collection?

In the last month of my father’s life, I read to him Alice Munro’s essay, “Working for a Living.” We had one of our last book discussions about that fox farm, the cold work, and the landscape of Canada. She was the first person I contacted. I wrote her a letter and a few months later she called and said yes, of course you can reprint my essay. I was just stunned. The other authors followed. I invited the authors my father loved or had met at some point in his life. He had dinner with Lee Smith once and she was so quick to respond. Lee led me to Jill McCorkle. I also included three former students. In the end, this collection of women writers became one big circle of friends.

How did your vision for this collection evolve from the start to end of this project?
At first I saw this as a collection of southern writers, men and women. But then I realized I just wanted to hear from women, daughters. I moved away from regionalizing it when I began thinking of my father’s literary tastes and what kind of man he was. He was southern but he was also very much shaped by Chicago and the Mid-West. Each time I read an essay, I would think, Would Dad like this?

Did you come to realize anything about your relationship with your father as you read through the essays in this collection?                                                                                                 
I knew from the start that we were close, and that a good part of that closeness was how we stayed connected through literature. Now, I realize exactly how close we really were. 
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